Category > Audio/Video

N. Katherine Hayles, “Interview with Alan Liu.” Online addendum to Hayles, How We Think for How We Think: Digital Media and Contemporary Technogenesis (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012). Interview posted May 2013.

Publicity poster“The Meaning of the Digital Humanities.” Goldstone Lecture. New York University. 1 May 2013.

  • Video Video of talk (1 hr. 47 min.) [Talk presents a fuller version of the paper subsequently published in PMLA.]


“4Humanities: Values, Strategies, Technologies for Humanities Advocacy in the Digital Age.” University of Virginia. 17 April 2013.

Co-presented with Rama Hoetzlein. “History of Thought as a Networked Community: The RoSE Prototype.” University of Virginia. 16 April 2013.

  • Abstract: What if bibliographies of past authors and works could be modeled as a dynamic, evolving society linked to today’s scholars and students? What if scholars and students could add data about biographical, historical, and intellectual relationships to the bibliographical entries, thus using present-day crowdsourcing to make more socially meaningful the crowds of history? And what if visualizations could help us actively “storyboard” intellectual movements and not just spectate them? Alan Liu and Rama Hoetzlein present the conceptual framework and some of the discoveries and challenges of the RoSE Research-oriented Social Environment (in beta at the conclusion of a NEH Digital Humanities Start-up grant).
  • Sound file Podcast of talk. (1 hr, 7 min.)


“This is Not a Book: Transliteracies and Long Forms of Digital Attention.” Translittératies Conference, École normale supérieure de Cachan, Paris. 7 November 2012.

  • Abstract: This talk argues that in the digital age, the “book”–whether physical, digital, or in some other media–is only a metaphor for “long forms of shared attention.” The book dissolves into, but also persists in, slowly-changing networks of discourse that are “transliteracies” because they span across media, across networks, and across time. The talk concludes with examples of recent digital projects–including the RoSE (Research-oriented Social Environment) at University of California, Santa Barbara–that attempt to represent such long forms of shared digital attention.
  • Slides from talk
  • Video Video of Alan’s talk
  • Video Videos of other keynote talks


Liu Keynote Talk“Close, Distant, and Unexpected Reading: The Modern Paradigm of Literary Analysis.” Digital Humanities Australasia 2012 (inaugural conference of Australasian Association for Digital Humanities), Australian National University, Canberra. 28 March 2012.


“UCSB English Professor Receives NEH Grant for Humanities Bibliographical Social Network” (press release on RoSE). 11 January 2012. UCSB Office of Public Affairs Press.


 

“Where Is Cultural Criticism in the Digital Humanities?” (30-minute version). Digital Literacies panel. The Future University conference. Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences, and Humanities (CRASSH), Cambridge University. 2 July 2011.


“This is Not a Book: Long Forms of Shared Attention in the Digital Age.” Panel on “What is a Book?”, Unbound Book Conference, Central Library, Amsterdam, and Royal Library, The Hague. 20 May 2011.


“Cultural Criticism and the Digital Humanities: Alan Liu.” Interview by Janneke Adema for Culture Machine. 19 May 2011. Amsterdam.

 

Alan giving talk at HUMlab“Close, Distant, and Unexpected Reading: New Forms of Literary Reading in the Digital Age.” HUMlab, Umeå University, Sweden. 10 May 2011.


Poster for TILTS Symposium, U Texas Austin“The University in the Digital Age: The Big Questions.” Texas Institute of Literary and Textual Studies symposium on “Digital Humanities: Teaching and Learning.” University of Texas, Austin. 10 March 2011. (Talk presented via Skype.)


Interview by David Miller, Director, Center for Digital Humanities, University of South Carolina. 10 September 2010.


 

“From Reading to Social Computing.” Center for Digital Humanities, University of South Carolina. 9 September 2010.


 

“Strange Bookshelves.” Panel on “Humanities and Technology: The Past Ten Years, The Next Ten Years.” HumaniTech. University of California, Irvine. 19 May 2009.


“Peopling the Police: A Social Computing Approach to Information Authority in the Age of Web 2.0.” Center for Information Technology and Society (CITS). University of California, Santa Barbara. 21 February 2008.


 

“Knowledge 2.0? — The University and Web 2.0.” “Renewals” Conference. English Subject Centre. Royal Holloway, University of London. 6 July 2007.


 

Publicity Flyer for Lecture“Imagining the New Media Encounter.” Keynote lecture for “Interfaces and Visualizations: A State-of-the-Art Conference on the Humanities in Post-human Times” and Center for Advanced Study’s MillerComm Lecture Series. University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. 20 April 2007.

* Publicity flyer for lecture.
* Video Video of talk (1 hr 22 min.; RealVideo)
* Sound fileAudio only (1 hr 22 min.; RealAudio)

 

“Thinking Destruction: Creativity, Rational Choice, Emergence, and Destruction Theory.” Inaugural conference of the National Humanities Center initiative on “Autonomy, Singularity, Creativity: The Human and the Humanities.” National Humanities Center. Research Triangle, North Carolina. 10 November 2006.

 

Interview with Alan Liu conducted during the Pauley Symposium on “History in the Digital Age.” University of Nebraska–Lincoln. 22 September 2006.

 

Interview by Sue Thomas. Mapping the Transition from Page to Screen research project. trAce Online Writing Center. Nottingham Trent University, UK. October 2002.

 

Interview. Center for Information Technology (CITS). University of California, Santa Barbara. 20 August 2001.

 

“The Tribe of Cool: Information Culture and History.” Keynote address. Association for Computers and the Humanities & Association for Literary and Linguistic Computing (ACH-ALLC) conference. New York University. 16 June 2001.