Category > Talks
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“From Reading to Social Computing.” Workshop in the Stanford U., Mills C., UC Berkeley, and UC Santa Cruz “What is a Reader?” project. Stanford University. 21 May 2010.


“RoSE (Research-oriented Social Environment).” Media Arts & Technology 595M Seminar Series. University of California, Santa Barbara. 17 May 2010.


“From Reading to Social Computing.” Keynote address. Northeast Modern Language Association convention. Montreal. 9 April 2010.


“Friending the Past: The Sense of History and Social Computing.” Maxwell Cummings Distinguished Lecture. McGill University. 8 April 2010.


“From Reading to Social Computing.” University of Kansas, Lawrence. 8 March 2010.


“RoSE (Research-oriented Social Environment).” Transliteracies Project Design Charrette. University of California, Santa Barbara. 16 February 2010.


“The Future of Graduate Education.” Panel on the Future of Graduate Education. Interdisciplinary Humanities Center, University of California, Santa Barbara. 29 October 2009.


“Literature and Data.” Theory and New Media Studies Colloquium. Yale University. 7 October 2009.

Readings for event:
  1. Alan Liu, Local Transcendence: Essays on Postmodern Historicism and the Database (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008), pp. 239-40
  2. Franco Moretti, Graphs, Maps, Trees: Abstract Models for a Literary History (London; New York: Verso, 2005), pp. 1-33, 91-92
  3. Alan Liu, “Digital Humanities and Academic Change,” English Language Notes 47.1 (Spring/Summer 2009): 17-35

Notes & Links for event


“Friending the Past: The Sense of History and Social Computing.” Yale University. 6 October 2009.


“Peopling the Police: A Social Computing Approach to Information Authority in the Age of Web 2.0.” The Big Picture lecture series. Art Center College of Design, Pasadena. 13 July 2009.


“Introduction to a Research Slam.” University of California, Santa Barbara. 22 May 2009.


“Strange Bookshelves.” Panel on “Humanities and Technology: The Past Ten Years, The Next Ten Years.” HumaniTech. University of California, Irvine. 19 May 2009.


University of Michigan, Ann Arbor“The End of the End of the Book: Dead Books, Lively Margins, and Social Computing.” Conference on “Bookishness: The New Fate of Reading in the Digital Age.” University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. 15 May 2009. (Photos of campus and event)

“Literature+” Simpson Center. University of Washington, Seattle. 8 May 2009.

Simpson Center, University of WashingtonThis talk/seminar focuses on how digital technologies now bring the core paradigms of research disciplines into close proximity, forcing such uncomfortable questions for the humanities (especially, literature departments) as: “what is ‘interpretation’ for?” or “what is the future of interpretation?”

“When Was Linearity?: Linear Thought, Graphics, and Freedom in the Age of Knowledge Work.” Simpson Center. University of Washington, Seattle. 7 May 2009.

'Red' Square, University of Washington

  • Talk Abstract: “On May 7-8, 2009 the Simpson Center will host Alan Liu, Professor and Chair of the Department of English, University of California, Santa Barbara, as the first Digital Humanities Commons Visiting Scholar. His public talk, ‘Linear Thought, Graphics, and Freedom in the Age of Knowledge Work,’ will address the shift from print-based linear thought to digital principles of non-linear movement. Liu will also conduct an informal seminar with faculty and graduate students.”
  • Related seminar taught by Joseph Milutis at U. Washington: “Creative Destruction: Reading Alan Liu” (May 1 and 8, 2009)
  • Photos of campus and Simpson Center

“Digital Humanities and Academic Change.” Gilbert Lecture Series. Southern Methodist University. 16 April 2009.

Interior of Dallas Hall, Southern Methodist University

  • Talk abstract: “Taking as his starting point a series of digital projects he started (beginning with the Voice of the Shuttle in 1994), Professor Liu argues that the digital humanities are catalyzing fundamental changes in humanities practices (writing,reading, interpreting, criticism, peer review, and teaching) and organization (especially the academic department, which Liu’s own department has remodeled around internal, entrepreneurial ‘centers’). His emphasis is on the evolving relation between what the humanities ‘know’ and alternative paradigms of knowledge in the sciences, engineering, and social sciences. The talk scales from the practical to the theoretical, and ends on a guess that the digital humanities augur a new humanities that might be called the ‘global humanities.'”
  • Photos of campus

San Francisco Hilton“From Reading to Social Computing.” Panel on “Methodologies for Literary Studies in the Digital Age.” Modern Language Association convention. San Francisco. 28 December 2008.
(Photos)

“Digital Humanities and Academic Change.” Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (CRASSH). Cambridge University. 18 September 2008.

 

“The New Media Encounter+.” Panel on the Blackwell Companion to Digital Literary Studies. Digital Resources in the Humanities and Arts conference (DRHA 2008). Cambridge University. 17 September 2008.

 

DRHA 2008 Conference“Peopling the Police: A Social Computing Approach to Information Authority in the Age of Web 2.0.” Digital Resources for the Humanities and Arts conference (DRHA 2008). Cambridge University. 15 September 2008. (Photos of Cambridge and DRHA)

 

Michael Grave's Portland Building“Digital Humanities and Academic Change.” Reed College. 10 September 2008.

 

Reed College campus“‘A Forming Hand': Creativity and Destruction from Romanticism to Emergence Theory.” Reed College. 9 September 2008. (Photos)

 

“Emergent Visual Collaboration.” Networking Visual Culture brainstorming meeting (for Visual Culture Council). Institute for Multimedia Literacy. University of Southern California. 7 June 2008.


 

“Peopling the Police: A Social Computing Approach to Information Authority in the Age of Web 2.0.” Digital Humanities Summer Institute. University of Victoria. 16 May 2008.


“The Agrippa Process: ‘Agrippa (A Book of the Dead)’ in the Age of Web 2.0.” New Media Workshop. University of Chicago. 19 May 2008.


“Digital Humanities and Academic Change.” Meeting with the University Chicago Committee on Digital Humanities. University of Chicago. 19 May 2008.


“Peopling the Police: A Social Computing Approach to Information Authority in the Age of Web 2.0.” Department of Information Studies. UCLA. 15 May 2008.


“Globalism, Interdisciplinarity, and Digital Technology.” Workshop on “The Aesthetics of Imperialism: Matters of Time and Place.” University of California Japanese Arts and Globalizations Multi-Campus Research Group. University of California, Santa Barbara. 11 May 2008.


“Epilogue to a Research Slam.” University of California, Santa Barbara. 9 May 2008.


“Digital Humanities and Academic Change.” Rutgers University, New Brunswick. 2 May 2008.


Richard E. Miller at Writers House, Rutgers U.“Peopling the Police: A Social Computing Approach to Information Authority in the Age of Web 2.0.” Rutgers University, New Brunswick. 1 May 2008.


“Knowledge 2.0: Social Computing, the Humanities, and Public Knowledge in the Age of Web 2.0.” The Truth of the Humanities Lecture Series. Indiana University. 16 April 2008.


 

Seeing Knowledge Work symposium poster“When Was Linearity? The Meaning of Graphics in the Age of Knowledge Work.” Keynote talk at the “Seeing Knowledge Work” Graduate Symposium. Department of Art and Architecture. University of California, Santa Barbara. 11 April 2008.


 

“Peopling the Police: A Social Computing Approach to Information Authority in the Age of Web 2.0.” Center for Information Technology and Society (CITS). University of California, Santa Barbara. 21 February 2008.


 

“Knowledge 2.0: The Transliteracies Project and Social Computing.” University of California, Irvine. 19 November 2007.

 

“Digital Humanities and Academic Change.” Co-speaker with Lyn Hejinian, State of the Profession Colloquia series. Department of English. University of Colorado, Boulder. 11 October 2007.

 

“Knowledge and Web 2.0: The Transliteracies Project and Social Computing.” Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research. Texas A & M University. 4 October 2007.

 

“Digital Humanities and Academic Change.” University of Auckland. 31 August 2007.

 

“Digital Humanities and Academic Change.” Victoria University, Wellington. 30 August 2007.

 

Presentation at discussion meeting to exchange ideas on the role of the humanities in information-technology development strategy with representatives of the National Library of New Zealand, The Encyclopedia of New Zealand, and Research and Education Advanced Network New Zealand( REANNZ). National Library of New Zealand, Wellington. 29 August 2007.

 

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